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SRP 3rd Quarter Participant Webinar

TO ROTH OR NOT TO ROTH…THAT IS THE QUESTION

Many retirement plans now offer a Roth contribution option, but only 23% of individuals are using this feature*. There’s still considerable confusion about Roth and many continue to ask, “What’s right for me?” Join us for an easy-to-understand overview of Roth contributions and the key factors one should consider when selecting Pre-tax v. Roth (or a combination of the two). At last…this is the Roth overview you’ve been waiting for!

All retirement plan participants and eligible employees are welcome!

Please join us on Tuesday, August 11th (1:00pm EST / 12:00pm CST / 10:00am PST) for this live Participant Education event!

REGISTER HERE: https://srpretire.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Im5nixfOSZ64iZOj0qK-EQ

Limited space available so register today!

This session will be recorded.

*Source: 401khelpcenter.com

Strategic Retirement Partners and its associates do not provide tax advice. Accordingly, any discussions of U.S. tax matters contained herein (including any attachments) is not intended for written to be used, and cannot be used, in connection with the promotion, marketing or recommendation by anyone unaffiliated with Strategic Retirement Partners of any of the matters addressed herein or for the purpose of avoiding U.S. tax-related penalties.

Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services are offered through Global Retirement Partners, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor. Global Retirement Partners and Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP) are separate entities from LPL Financial.

Global Retirement Partners employs (or contracts with) individuals who may be (1) registered representatives of LPL Financial and investment advisor representatives of Global Retirement Partners; or (2) solely investment advisor representatives of Global Retirement Partners. Although all personnel operate their business under the name Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP) they are each possibly subject to differing obligations and limitations and may be able to provide differing products or services.

RIGHT. SIZE. YOUR. RISK.

The recent market ride may have you feeling like you are living in a real-life risk tolerance questionnaire.

“What is the worst loss you would tolerate?”
“What best describes your investment attitude?”
“Do your investments keep you up at night?”

Use this time of volatility as your personal wake-up call. Take action today to ensure your investments align with your time horizon and risk tolerance.

Fill out SRP’s Risk Tolerance Questionnaire and compare the results to your investment allocation. If you need help, request a consultation with the seasoned advisors at SRP.

 

Click here to download the Risk Tolerance Questionnaire

 

SRP is here to help.
plantoday@srpretire.com / 866-SRP-401K x1

Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services are offered through Global Retirement Partners, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor. Global Retirement Partners and Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP) are separate entities from LPL Financial.

Global Retirement Partners employs (or contracts with) individuals who may be (1) registered representatives of LPL Financial and investment adviser representatives of Global Retirement Partners; or (2) solely investment adviser representatives of Global Retirement Partners. Although all personnel operate their businesses under the name Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP), they are each possibly subject to differing obligations and limitations and may be able to provide differing products or services.

Market Update – June 30, 2020

The July Fourth holiday will be very different this year. Although it’s a time to enjoy family and friends, and maybe even watch some fireworks, social distancing and a new wave of COVID-19 cases also may take a seat at the picnic table. We all continue to believe our doctors and medical community will help us conquer this disease; however, with more than 10 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 around the globe (Johns Hopkins), this terrible fight is far from over. Meanwhile, the US economy appears to be turning a major corner, and better times may be ahead later in 2020.

Recent economic data has created some fireworks itself, coming in significantly better than what economists had expected, and in some cases, beating previous records. For example, the May US Bureau of Labor Statistics employment report showed a record 2.5 million jobs created—10 million more than economists expected, according to Bloomberg. Additionally, retail sales soared nearly 18% in May, according to the US Census Bureau, again much better than what was expected. Even though these rebounds are coming off historically low levels, it has been encouraging to see how quickly the economy may be coming back.

The big question, though, is when will the economy get back to normal? Although parts of our economy are coming back quickly, other areas may take years to come back fully. Industries like hotels, restaurants, and airlines are going to be under pressure for a long time. In fact, in the 10 US recessions since 1950, it took nearly 30 months on average for all of the jobs that were lost to come back. More recently, it took four years for all the jobs to return after the tech bubble recession in the early 2000s, and more than six years for all of the lost jobs to return after the financial crisis of 2008–09. Our economy has lost nearly 20 million jobs in the past three months, and even with re-hiring activity in May and June, it may take years to recover all of those job losses. (Jobs data from US Census Bureau)

A major second wave of COVID-19 is the big wild card. Although most of us don’t expect to go into full lockdown mode again like we did in March and April, more restrictions may be put in place, which could hinder the economic recovery. But it isn’t all bad news. On June 22, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, said at a congressional hearing that a vaccine may be available by early 2021. He noted that in the past it has taken years to develop a vaccine against viruses, but with the entire world working together to beat COVID-19, this vaccine may be the fastest to market ever produced.

Voltaire said, “History never repeats itself. Man always does.” Given the stock market is driven by fear and greed, it has very human-like qualities, which means history may be a guide for what may happen next. In March 2003, stocks hit a major low before a huge spike into early summer, when stocks consolidated—or sat on their gains—during the summer months, followed by an eventual move higher later in the year. There was a very similar reaction in the summer of 2009 after the March 2009 bear market lows. So far in 2020 we’ve had the March lows and a huge rally, so historically, a summertime pullback or consolidation would be normal—and maybe even healthy.

While we’ve faced several health, social, and economic crises this year, July Fourth is a good time to think about how lucky we are to live in this great country and to remember the resilience and perseverance we’ve demonstrated over the past 244 years. History has shown us that better times will come.

 

 

 

Important Information
This material is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. There is no assurance that the views or strategies discussed are suitable for all investors or will yield positive outcomes. Investing involves risks including possible loss of principal. Any economic forecasts set forth may not develop as predicted and are subject to change.

References to markets, asset classes, and sectors are generally regarding the corresponding market index. Indexes are unmanaged statistical composites and cannot be invested into directly. Index performance is not indicative of the performance of any investment and do not reflect fees, expenses, or sales charges. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results.

All data is provided as of June 30, 2020.

Any company names noted herein are for educational purposes only and not an indication of trading intent or a solicitation of their products or services. LPL Financial doesn’t provide research on individual equities.

All index data from FactSet.

This Research material was prepared by LPL Financial, LLC. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however LPL Financial makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy.

Market Update – June 4, 2020

As we look ahead to the summer months, we can’t help but think what a challenging year it’s been so far. At the same time, we’re encouraged by the resiliency and accelerated innovation among US businesses and the efforts by our national, state, and local governments to support our communities. And we continue to be amazed by the unparalleled dedication and cooperation among our front-line healthcare professionals and medical researchers to see us through to the other side of this health crisis.

In a similar way, the recent strength of the financial markets appears to be looking beyond continued economic weakness. Much of the economic news has been dismal, and there may be more bad news ahead, but economic data is backward-looking. It’s important to remember that the stock market looks forward.

Economic numbers are still negative, but they aren’t as bad as they were a month ago, and that’s usually been a prelude to things starting to get better. New claims for unemployment are still historically high, but they’ve improved eight weeks in a row, and the total number of people on the unemployment rolls has actually started to drop (US Labor Bureau). Manufacturing activity contracted in May, according to the Institute for Supply Management Purchasing Managers’ Index, but it was better than the prior month for the first time since January. And new home sales actually rose in the most recent US Census Bureau data for April, when they were widely expected to collapse.

Small businesses are anticipating better times ahead, too. In a recent survey by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), small businesses expressed the most optimism about the economy improving than at any time in the last year and a half. And if they expect improvement, they’ll prepare for it—by retaining or rehiring workers, restocking inventories, and continuing to follow best practices for keeping customers safe.

Looking forward also means gauging the ongoing impact of fiscal support. In the United States, Congress is working on a new stimulus package. The European Commission recently announced an unprecedented 750 billion euro stimulus. Japan has announced additional stimulus that could bring its total pandemic response to 40% of that country’s gross domestic product (GDP). While debt levels are rising and may have to be addressed in the future, these current fiscal actions continue to play an important role in limiting any long-term economic damage from the recession.

The stock market may have gotten a little ahead of itself, and there still may be bouts of volatility, but recent gains in the S&P 500 Index are not out of character. Like us, the markets are seeing things to look forward to. Consider the recent rally as the stock market’s version of anticipating dinner out with friends, enjoying a ballgame, or planning a vacation. These may not be right around the corner, and there may be setbacks along the way, but the plans have been made.

 

 

 

Important Information
This material is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. There is no assurance that the views or strategies discussed are suitable for all investors or will yield positive outcomes. Investing involves risks including possible loss of principal. Any economic forecasts set forth may not develop as predicted and are subject to change.

References to markets, asset classes, and sectors are generally regarding the corresponding market index. Indexes are unmanaged statistical composites and cannot be invested into directly. Index performance is not indicative of the performance of any investment and do not reflect fees, expenses, or sales charges. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results.

All data is provided as of June 3, 2020.

Any company names noted herein are for educational purposes only and not an indication of trading intent or a solicitation of their products or services. LPL Financial doesn’t provide research on individual equities.

All index data from FactSet.

This Research material was prepared by LPL Financial, LLC. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however LPL Financial makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy.

Market Update – May 21, 2020

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.” — F. Scott Fitzgerald

The economic struggles in our country are among the worst we’ve ever seen. In April, a record 20 million people lost their jobs, and 36 million people have filed for unemployment since the COVID-19 pandemic struck in mid-March. Record drops in consumer confidence, manufacturing, and spending are all adding to the immediate economic fallout. Specific industries have been devastated, with names like J.C. Penney, J.Crew, and Neiman Marcus filing for bankruptcy.

Clothing sales are down 89%, furniture sales down 66%, and restaurant sales down 49% from this time last year, according to the United States Census Bureau. Yet, as F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, these many single defeats won’t necessarily add up to the final defeat. Our country has survived many trying times before, and we are starting to see glimmers of hope on both the medical and economic fronts. Our resolve and fortitude will once again shine, as we head toward better times in the second half of 2020.

More testing for COVID-19 is needed to help identify infected people and to stop the virus from spreading. As testing has soared, the number of positive COVID-19 results as a percentage of total tests has trended lower, and that percentage consistently has been beneath 10%, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project. In addition, doctors have developed a “toolbox” of drugs to help provide patients a better chance at survival. Antiviral drugs like remdesivir in combination with other drugs are showing significantly better results now than just a few weeks ago. The World Health Organization has reported “potentially positive data” in several treatments. Although a vaccine could still be a year or more away, human drug trials are underway with encouraging initial results.

In the face of the devastating loss of human life and historically weak economic data, however, the S&P 500 Index has experienced one of its greatest short-term rallies ever, up more than 30% from the March 23 lows at its recent peak. Based on historical trends, a warranted correction in stocks over the coming months may be possible. Stock valuations are historically expensive, tensions are building between the United States and China, the stock market’s momentum is showing signs of waning, and we’re entering the historically weak summer months—all of these are reasons to be alert. History bears this out. All major S&P 500 bear markets in the past 60 years had a significant bounce off the market lows, followed by a correction of about 10% on average before another surge higher. Based on this historical trend, a market correction of 8–12% after the recent big rally may be likely over the coming months.

While current economic data may sound bad, it’s important to remember it is backward-looking. Real-time economic data points such as public transportation, traveler data from the Transportation Security Administration, fuel sales, railroad traffic, and federal tax withholding are all showing improvement as the economy begins to re-open.

Finally, small businesses are the lifeblood of the US economy, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows they employ 47% of all private sector jobs. Recent data showed small businesses are as optimistic about the next six months as they’ve been in 18 months, suggesting the worst may be behind us, and a growing demand for their products and services could be brewing. The pain from this recession is impacting all of us, but better times are coming.

 

 

 

Important Information
This material is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. There is no assurance that the views or strategies discussed are suitable for all investors or will yield positive outcomes. Investing involves risks including possible loss of principal. Any economic forecasts set forth may not develop as predicted and are subject to change.

References to markets, asset classes, and sectors are generally regarding the corresponding market index. Indexes are unmanaged statistical composites and cannot be invested into directly. Index performance is not indicative of the performance of any investment and do not reflect fees, expenses, or sales charges. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results.

All data is provided as of May 19, 2020.

Any company names noted herein are for educational purposes only and not an indication of trading intent or a solicitation of their products or services. LPL Financial doesn’t provide research on individual equities.

All index data from FactSet.

This Research material was prepared by LPL Financial, LLC. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however LPL Financial makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy.

How To Get Back In The Market

In your own effort to avoid the ups and downs of the recent market ride, perhaps you made the decision to move your retirement account assets away from equities and into cash. You know you don’t want to sit on the sidelines of the market forever. Weeks later, are you left wondering…

How Do I Get Back In the Market?

Watch this 5-minute video from SRP’s Giorgina Nguyen, CFP®
to hear 3 strategies to get back in the market.
(Hint: she may even share a 4th bonus strategy for SRP participants!)

SRP is here to help.

 

 

 

 

Giorgina Nguyen is a registered representative with, and securities are offered through, LPL Financial. Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services are offered through Global Retirement Partners, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor. Global Retirement Partners and Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP) are separate entities from LPL Financial.

Global Retirement Partners employs (or contracts with) individuals who may be (1) registered representatives of LPL Financial and investment adviser representatives of Global Retirement Partners; or (2) solely investment adviser representatives of Global Retirement Partners. Although all personnel operate their businesses under the name Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP), they are each possibly subject to differing obligations and limitations and may be able to provide differing products or services.

This material was created for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as ERISA, tax, legal or investment advice. If you are seeking investment advice specific to your needs, such advice services must be obtained on your own separate from this educational material.

Investing in stock includes numerous specific risks including: the fluctuation of dividend, loss of principal and potential illiquidity of the investment in a falling market. Bonds are subject to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Bond values will decline as interest rates rise and bonds are subject to availability and change in price. Dollar cost averaging involves continuous investment in securities regardless of fluctuation in price levels of such securities. An investor should consider their ability to continue purchasing through fluctuating price levels. Such a plan does not assure a profit and does not protect against loss in declining markets An investment in a target date fund is not guaranteed at any time, including on or after the target date, the approximate date when an investor in the fund would retire and leave the workforce. Target date funds gradually shift their emphasis from more aggressive investments to more conservative ones based on the target date. All investing involves risk including loss of principal. No strategy assures success or protects against loss.

Market Update – May 7, 2020

Investors like labels for the economy and financial markets—many of them with the word “great” in them. The Great Depression. The Great Recession. The Great Lockdown. Well, we’ve moved into what we might call the Great Disconnect. How can stocks have rebounded so strongly in the last month amid so much suffering and economic damage? What’s Wall Street seeing that so many on Main Street are not?

For one, in the United States more than 20 states have already begun to reopen their economies, and others have plans to begin very soon. In Europe, lockdowns are being eased, following Asia’s lead. Even gradual progress like this may help the stock market focus more on what’s ahead than where we are right now.

As lockdown restrictions are lifted, timely indicators like vehicle traffic, electricity consumption, public transportation use, daily consumer confidence surveys, and a wide variety of weekly economic indicators point to a low mark in economic activity in the United States in April. The “Great Lockdown” recession of 2020 may be over already—although it may not be officially declared a recession for several more months.

Nowhere to go but up isn’t normally very reassuring, but to the stock market it may be. Historically, when things have looked their worst, the opportunity in stocks has tended to be the best. The S&P 500 Index has usually hit its bottom and started the climb back up about five months before a recession has ended.

Other factors have helped boost investor sentiment recently. Market participants have gained confidence from the bold stimulus response from policymakers in Washington, DC, and the Federal Reserve. The total amount of the stimulus this year is about 22% of the entire US economy, based on gross domestic product (GDP). During the entire 2008–09 financial crisis, the total amount of stimulus was 16.6% of GDP. And there may be more. Surging unemployment and weakening finances at the state and municipal levels may be catalysts for more action. Though millions of jobs have been lost to this crisis, many millions surely have been saved as well.

The medical community also has provided reasons for optimism. Though no one knows for sure when a COVID-19 vaccine will be ready, rapid progress is being made, and several promising candidates are now in human trials. Testing capacity has also ramped up, while some of the best capitalized and most innovative companies in the world are developing contact-tracing tools to help facilitate safe re-openings. While stocks may have come a bit too far, too fast in the short term, markets are clearly responding to these positive developments.

Reopening the US economy will be a gradual process, and temporary setbacks may be possible. Some of the lost jobs may not return. The possibility of disappointment as the “Great Reopen” unfolds is real. We are facing a tremendous challenge, but it is being met with incredible resilience, resourcefulness, and innovation. Together we will get through this crisis and return to better times.

 

 

 

 

 

Important Information

This material is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. There is no assurance that the views or strategies discussed are suitable for all investors or will yield positive outcomes. Investing involves risks including possible loss of principal. Any economic forecasts set forth may not develop as predicted and are subject to change.

References to markets, asset classes, and sectors are generally regarding the corresponding market index. Indexes are unmanaged statistical composites and cannot be invested into directly. Index performance is not indicative of the performance of any investment and do not reflect fees, expenses, or sales charges. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results.

All data is provided as of May 6, 2020.

Any company names noted herein are for educational purposes only and not an indication of trading intent or a solicitation of their products or services. LPL Financial doesn’t provide research on individual equities.

This Research material was prepared by LPL Financial, LLC. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however LPL Financial makes no representation as to its completeness or accuracy.

Documents You Need In A Crisis

Many of us are home indefinitely and may be attending to projects that would have otherwise gone unnoticed in 2020. Consider rounding up the documents below (or conferring with aging parents as to the whereabouts of these documents). These can be critical when managing any kind of healthcare situation.

Health Insurance policies – most likely, your parent’s hospital and doctor costs will be covered by traditional Medicare, or a Medicare Advantage Plan. If your parent has traditional Medicare, find out whether their coverage includes a Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plan that covers the Medicare deductibles and co-insurance. Also, review the prescription drug plan to learn what that covers. If your parent has a retirement health insurance plan from another employer, contact the HR department for help in understanding coverage.

Long Term Care policy –  this type of coverage mostly pays for custodial help with activities of daily living. Some older plans from the 1990’s may only pay for nursing home care, so be aware of that.  Most plans sold in the past 20 years will cover all forms of care from home health care, to assisted living, memory care, hospice, and nursing home care. Please bring any of these plans to me as I will be happy to review them for you.

Bank Assets, Investment Accounts, Life Insurance, Annuities – figure out how much money is available to pay for your parent’s care. Determine which funds are liquid and how you an access the funds.  Without a Financial Power of Attorney, you may not be able to exercise control over your parent’s finances. And if you have a Power of Attorney, submit the document to each bank, Investment Company, and insurance company immediately.  A Power of Attorney is only as good as the willingness of a financial institution to honor it.  Unfortunately, there is no legal requirement that they do so.  If a particular institution refuses to honor a properly executed Power of Attorney, engage an elder law attorney to help you.

Health Care Power of Attorney – gives you the authority to make medical decisions for your parents such as choosing or rejecting treatment, dismissing physicians, and selecting rehabilitation facilities.

Living Will – a written statement detailing a person’s desires regarding their medical treatment in circumstances in which they are no longer able to express informed consent, also called an “advanced directive”.

Do Not Resuscitate Order – (DNR) – specifies whether a parent wants to be revived if he or she stops breathing.

Durable Financial Power of Attorney – this document gives you the power to manage your parent’s financial affairs. This includes a variety of tasks such as buying and selling assets, paying bills from their bank accounts, or accessing IRA funds. Please make sure this document is “durable”. Durable means that the terms of the document remain in effect even after your parent becomes incapable of making their own decisions.

Trust Documents – if your parents have set up trusts, review them now.  Unfortunately, people often set up trusts without properly transferring the intended assets. Check to see if trusts are funded properly.  Also, find out if funds can be withdrawn, and by whom. Get in touch with the attorney that drafted the trust, if possible.

 

 

 

 

Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services are offered through Global Retirement Partners, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor. Global Retirement Partners and Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP) are separate entities from LPL Financial.

Global Retirement Partners employs (or contracts with) individuals who may be (1) registered representatives of LPL Financial and investment adviser representatives of Global Retirement Partners; or (2) solely investment adviser representatives of Global Retirement Partners. Although all personnel operate their businesses under the name Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP), they are each possibly subject to differing obligations and limitations and may be able to provide differing products or services.

This information is not intended to be a substitute for individualized legal advice. Please consult your legal advisor regarding your specific situation.

Strategic Retirement Partners Named a 2020 Best Places to Work for Financial Advisers by InvestmentNews

InvestmentNews has recognized Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP) as a 2020 Best Places to Work for Financial Advisers.

Strategic Retirement Partners was chosen as one of this year’s top-75 firms based on employer and employee surveys, evaluating company culture, benefits, career paths, and more.

Jeff Cullen, SRP’s Managing Partner shared “Work-life balance is the theme at Strategic Retirement Partners where 70% of the team works from home in a cloud-based environment. SRP’s talent and culture centric philosophy toward human capital is their “Secret Sauce” in attracting and retaining top-tier advisors. Advisors benefit from a suite of services including operational support, relationship management, innovative IT solutions, marketing, and investment research.”

Now in its third year, InvestmentNews partnered with Best Companies Group, an independent research firm specializing in identifying great places to work, to compile the survey and recognition program.

“We are thrilled to identify, and commend, these 75 firms that understand the importance of a strong workplace culture,” said George Moriarty, InvestmentNews chief content officer. “They are role models to the industry, in that they empower advisers to focus on delivering exceptional service to their clients.”

Strategic Retirement Partners is highlighted in the April 27th issue of InvestmentNews and at bestplacesforadvisers.com.

 

 

About INVESTMENTNEWS
InvestmentNews is the leading source for news, analysis and information essential to the financial advisory community. Since 1998, their standard of editorial excellence and deep industry knowledge has allowed InvestmentNews to educate, inform and engage the most influential financial advisers. Through their weekly newspaper, website, newsletters, research, events, videos and webcasts, InvestmentNews provides exclusive and up-to-the-minute news, as well as actionable intelligence, that empowers financial advisers to serve their clients and run their businesses more effectively whenever, however and wherever they need it. Headquartered in New York, with offices in Chicago and Washington D.C., InvestmentNews is part of London-based Bonhill Group plc. Learn more at www.InvestmentNews.com.

About Strategic Retirement Partners
Strategic Retirement Partners is a nationwide independent retirement plan consulting services firm dedicated to providing guidance in decision-making and problem solving to employers and sponsors of retirement plans. With 20 offices from coast to coast, Strategic Retirement Partners currently consults on over 795 corporate and non-profit plans and over $11 billion in assets as of January 1, 2020.

 

 

 

Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services are offered through Global Retirement Partners, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor. Global Retirement Partners and Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP) are separate entities from LPL Financial.

Global Retirement Partners employs (or contracts with) individuals who may be (1) registered representatives of LPL Financial and investment adviser representatives of Global Retirement Partners; or (2) solely investment adviser representatives of Global Retirement Partners. Although all personnel operate their businesses under the name Strategic Retirement Partners (SRP), they are each possibly subject to differing obligations and limitations and may be able to provide differing products or services